Tag:NCAA football
Posted on: January 9, 2009 9:19 am
Edited on: January 10, 2009 6:58 am
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Re-inventing the Quarterback

There are rare times in our lives that we get to see revolution.  The word itself seems to imply a violent coup of existing ideologies, but Aristotle defined it simply as a change from one constitution to another in a very short time.  Revolution in sports has mostly been confined to radical deviation from team concepts.

Think the forward pass and the jump shot.  These revolutionary changes in sport are relatively rare.  More common (but still with high impact on the respective game) is the revolution of play and position.

Changing the fundamental aspects of individual performance requires several elements:  individual talent, opportunity, coaching, and hard work.  Apply these elements to those who have revolutionized their positions and you'll see what this means.  Whether you're talking about Dick Butkus or Tiger Woods, the mechanism is the same.  Individuals excel in bringing something new to a game and that, in turn, attracts imitation.

One of the best examples in the past 50 years is Lawrence Taylor.  Arriving at a time when linebackers were a second line of defense, LT pushed the edge and brought linebacker speed and method to the pass rush, fully re-defining his position.  We are perhaps witnessing a revolution of the college quarterback.  This revolution's name is Tim Tebow.

Many of you will shrug this off as simple conjecture, but stick with me.  Define a quarterback.  It's pretty simple...brain, eyes, and arm.  That's the definition we've been playing with for decades.  Sure, there have been a few quarterbacks with the ability to gain yards with their legs, but that's rarely by design and usually a product of broken play and an opportunistic adjustment.

Face it.  The game we've grown up with gives us running backs that run, receivers that catch, and quarterbacks that throw.  Tebow is breaking that paradigm as we watch, and the floodgates are opening.

Sure, Tebow's arm isn't great...but it's adequate.  His speed isn't explosive, but he brings power and vision to the running game.  Most of all he challenges defenses to cover more of the field in ways they are not designed to be covered.  Stack the box and he kills you with a goal line jump pass.  Drop into coverage and he runs for 12 yards.

Find a way to cover both and he hands off or pitches to a receiver on a toss sweep.  A product of the system?  In part.  But an even larger part is the type of player.  Big, strong, tenacious, and focused.  Words we usually associate with a defensive end or linebacker.  Now we're associating them with the quarterback.

Nothing happens overnight, but by Aristotle's definition this is revolution.  Mark these words...imitation is the most sincere recognition of success and revolution.  Go watch some high school football games next fall.

Sure, you'll see some pro-set quarterbacks on the field.  But more and more you'll be seeing teams take their best and most determined players and line them up behind center.  Revolution begins with youth and challenges our abilities to adapt to change.  This revolution has begun.
Posted on: December 15, 2008 11:15 am
Edited on: December 15, 2008 6:14 pm
 

"INSIGNIFICANT BOWL 2008"

Hot off of the heels of our wildly successful "Hate Bowl 2008", it's time to test the mettle of the College Football Bowl Season.  Welcome to "INSIGNIFICANT BOWL 2008".

A number of posters at the Hate Bowl expressed interest in a bowl season contest.  So here's my take on it.  There are 34 bowls this year, meaning SIXTY-EIGHT teams received a bid to a bowl game.  Now let me first say that I'm all in favor of rewarding good performance, but seriously, take a look at ANY 6-6 team and make a good argument to me that they deserve to go bowling.  THAT'S rewarding extreme mediocrity.  Well, that's enough of my rant.  Let's get down to "bidness".

I have listed each and every bowl game below.  My intent is to do this "Heisman" style.  You give me (in order, worst first) the five bowl games you consider to be the most insignificant.  I don't care what your criteria is.  Heck, the Heisman voters don't have a criteria, why should we?  Just rank 'em and spank 'em.  Point totals will be 5 for first place, 4 for second, 3 for third, 2 for fourth, and a single, lousy point for fifth.

As always, we welcome your candid and humorous comments.  Please, just keep 'em clean.    To post your votes, just add a comment to this blog.

And now, here are our party guests (payoffs in parentheses, followed by network).

Saturday, December 20:

Eagle Bank Bowl  Washington DC:  Navy (8-4) vs. Wake Forest (7-5) ($750,000)  ESPN
New Mexico Bowl  Albuquerque, NM:  Colorado State (6-6) vs. Fresno State (7-5) ($750,000)  ESPN
St. Petersburgh Bowl  St. Petersburgh, FL:  South Florida (7-5) vs. Memphis (6-6) ($1 million)  ESPN2
Las Vegas Bowl  Las Vegas, NV:  BYU (10-2) vs. Arizona (7-5) ($1 million) ESPN

Sunday, December 21:

New Orleans Bowl  New Orleans, LA:  Troy (8-4) vs. Southern Miss (6-6) ($325,000)  ESPN2

Tuesday, December 23:

Poinsettia Bowl  San Diego, CA:  Boise State (12-0) vs. TCU (10-2) ($750,000) ESPN

Wednesday, December 24:

Hawai'i Bowl  Honolulu, HI:  Hawai'i (7-6) vs. Notre Dame (6-6) ($750,000) ESPN

Friday, December 26:

Motor City Bowl  Detroit, MI:  Florida Atlantic (6-6) vs. Central Michigan (8-4) ($750,000) ESPN2

Saturday, December 27:

Meineke Bowl  Charlotte, NC:  North Carolina (8-4) vs. West Virginia (8-4) ($1 million) ESPN
Champs Sports Bowl  Orlando, FL:  Florida State (8-4) vs. Wisconsin (8-4) ($2.125 million ) ESPN
Emerald Bowl  San Fransisco, CA:  California (8-4) vs. Miami (7-5) ($750,000 to ACC, $850,000 to PAC10) ESPN

Sunday, December 28:

Independence Bowl  Shreveport, LA:  Louisiana Tech (7-5) vs. Northern Illinois (6-6) ($1.1 million) ESPN

Monday, December 29:

PapaJohns.com Bowl  Birmingham, AL:  Rutgers (7-5) vs. NC State (6-6) ($300,000) ESPN
Alamo Bowl  San Antonio, TX:  Northwestern (9-3) vs. Missouri (9-4) ($2.25 million) ESPN

Tuesday, December 30:

Humanitarian Bowl  Boise, ID:  Nevada (7-5) vs. Maryland (7-5) ($750,000) ESPN
Holiday Bowl  San Diego, CA:  Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Oregon (9-3) ($2.3 million) ESPN
Texas Bowl  Houston, TX:  Rice (9-3) vs. Western Michigan (9-3) ($750,000) NFLN

Wednesday, December 31:

Armed Forces Bowl  Fort Worth, TX:  Houston (7-5) vs. Air Force (8-4) ($750,000) ESPN
Sun Bowl  El Paso, TX:  Oregon State (8-4) vs. Pittsburgh (9-3) ($1.9 million) CBS
Music City Bowl  Nashville, TN:  Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Boston College (9-4) ($1.7 million) ESPN
Insight Bowl  Tempe, AZ:  Kansas (7-5) vs. Minnesota (7-5) ($1.2 million) NFLN
Chick-fil-A Bowl  Atlanta, GA:  LSU (7-5) vs. Georgia Tech (9-3) ($3 million) ESPN

Thursday, January 1:

Outback Bowl  Tampa, FL:  Iowa (8-4) vs. South Carolina (7-5) ($3.2 million) ESPN
Capital One Bowl  Orlando, FL:  Georgia (9-3) vs. Michigan State (9-3) ($4.25 million) ABC
Gator Bowl  Jacksonville, FL:  Nebraska (8-4) vs. Clemson (7-5) ($2.5 million) CBS
Rose Bowl  Pasadena, CA:  USC (11-1) vs. Penn State (11-1) ($17 million) ABC
Orange Bowl  Miami, FL:  Cincinnati (11-2) vs. Virginia Tech (9-4) ($17 million) FOX

Friday, January 2:

Cotton Bowl  Dallas, TX:  Texas Tech (11-1) vs. Mississippi (8-4) ($3 million) FOX
Liberty Bowl  Memphis, TN:  Kentucky (6-6) vs. East Carolina (9-4) ($1.8 million) ESPN
Sugar Bowl  New Orleans, LA:  Utah (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1) ($17 million) FOX

Saturday, January 3:

International Bowl  Toronto, Ontario, Canada:  Connecticut (7-5) vs. Buffalo (8-5) ($750,000) ESPN2
Fiesta Bowl  Glendale, AZ:  Texas (11-1) vs. Ohio State (10-2) ($17 million) FOX

Tuesday, January 6:

GMAC Bowl  Mobile, AL:  Tulsa (10-3) vs. Ball State (12-1) ($750,000) ESPN

Thursday, January 8:

BCS National Championship Game  Miami, FL:  Florida (12-1) vs. Oklahoma (12-1) ($17 million) FOX
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com